Netflix Thread

Discussion in 'DVU' started by Tigers, Jul 26, 2015.

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  1. J_E

    J_E
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    God Bless Dabo

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    Good Behavior, on TNT, is an amazing show. Its in the second season. I think it is a clever concept for a show and really done well.
     
  2. OpenMouthKissedaHorseOnce

    OpenMouthKissedaHorseOnce
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    Anybody seen Gypsy with Naomi Watts? Looking for a new show to binge. Seems interesting
     
  3. J_E

    J_E
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    God Bless Dabo

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    Pretty good. Think I watched all but like the last two episodes. There is a lot that goes on in the show and I lost interest toward the end but still worth a watch I would say.
     
  4. OpenMouthKissedaHorseOnce

    OpenMouthKissedaHorseOnce
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    Saw some Naomi Watts side boob but not sure it makes up for the rest of the show. We'll see
     
  5. J_E

    J_E
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    God Bless Dabo

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    I think you see whole boob at one point. Character development is slow but the concept is cool.
     
  6. Byrnes6d1

    Byrnes6d1
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    Started watching 13 reasons why. Very good put together show.

    It's always hard to talk about suicide and depresssiom. But I thought it did a good job.

    Santa Clara diet is funny. Hated gypsy.

    The last kingdom is good stuff.
     
  7. Dabo's Dance Coach

    Dabo's Dance Coach
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    It's a decent show. It gets a little ridiculous with some things, in my opinion, but I think the concept is good.
     
  8. HotButteredGrits

    HotButteredGrits
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    The BBC has finally confirmed a release date for the new season, which will start on BBC Two on Wednesday November 15 at 9pm.

    Season three was released on Netflix in the US just before its run ended on the BBC, so American fans should expect season four to arrive later this year.

    [​IMG]
     
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  9. gvtiger07

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    [​IMG]
     
  10. Adam

    Adam
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    First 38

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    I didn't even get through S3 of Peaky Blinders. Seemed to be a big step back. Should I revisit that?
     
  11. Aaron Nevilles Pet Tick

    Aaron Nevilles Pet Tick
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    Dabo Wizard
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    I thought Mind Hunters had too much going on, spread itself pretty thin. Decent first season though.
     
  12. Adam

    Adam
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    I'm half through it and it's pretty average. If I wasn't partial to cerebral crime shows in general, I would not have continued with this.
     
  13. tboon6317

    tboon6317
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    Whenever feasible, one should try to eat the rude.
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    Did 5 episodes of Stranger Things 2 on Sunday and finished the rest on Tuesday. Such a well done show. By far my favorite Netflix offering.
     
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  14. Tiger Roll

    Tiger Roll
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    allergic to jean shorts

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    ***POTENTIAL SPOILER ALERT - STRANGER THINGS 2***

    Every Major Pop-Culture Reference in Stranger Things 2, From A to Z


    Watching Stranger Things 2 is akin to letting a wave of ’80s pop-culture nostalgia wash over you, carrying you back to movies and shows you loved from your childhood. The Duffer Brothers have created a fascinating entertainment phenomenon by mining so much of what people loved about the era. While some of the winks and references in Stranger Things 2 are quite upfront — James Cameron, Stephen King, and Steven Spielberg definitely come to mind — others may have slid under your radar. Let us guide the way through the pop-culture tunnels that run throughout Hawkins, Indiana.

    • Children of the Corn
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      Photo: Courtesy of Netflix
      With so much Stephen King coursing its way through the Stranger Thingsuniverse, it’s impossible not to think of one of his most iconic stories when Hopper investigates the rotten produce around Hawkins, Indiana. When he sees something moving in a cornfield, you half expect a murderous child to leap out at him.

      Cujo
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      Photo: Courtesy of Netflix
      Again, Stephen King is everywhere in Stranger Things. It’s hard to find a major King story from before 1990 that’s not referenced. In the case of the Demodogs, they certainly behave like the titular villain from his novel about a killer canine. The tense scene when Steve is surrounded by Demodogs feels very King-esque, especially in the way the new villains of this season move on their target like a pack of animals.


      Dig Dug/Dragon’s Lair
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      Photo: Courtesy of Netflix
      The opening sequence of Stranger Things 2 sets the tone for the season, featuring the boys excitedly doing what so many of us did on our free nights in the ’80s — hitting the arcade. It allows the Duffers to play with arcade pop-culture references of the era, but they don’t choose the games highlighted in this sequence just by throwing darts at a board. Dragon’s Lair remains one of the hardest arcade games of all time, suggesting that the adventure will not be an easy one this season. As for Dig Dug, the game in which Dustin learns of a new challenger to his arcade prowess, it’s clearly also a reference to how much of Stranger Things 2 takes place underground, digging and dugging through the tunnels of the Upside Down.

      The Exorcist
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      Photo: Courtesy of Netflix
      The possession of Will by the Mind Flayer recalls a number of genre classics, but William Friedkin’s horror masterpiece comes most prominently to mind. It’s especially pronounced in the final moments of the season, in which Joyce uses overwhelming heat to force the Mind Flayer out of her son’s body.


      Firestarter
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      Photo: Courtesy of Netflix
      If the climactic sequence in which Eleven closes the gate on the Mind Flayer reminded you of a certain Stephen King movie starring Drew Barrymore, it wasn’t by accident. Not only is the color palette behind Eleven clearly inspired by the poster for Firestarter, but Netflix released a poster for Stranger Things 2 that made the parallel even more pronounced. Oh, and Firestarter just happens to be about a kid with psychic powers who learns how to use them to her advantage.


      Friday the 13th/Halloween
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      Photo: Courtesy of Netflix
      Two of the biggest pop-culture phenomena of the ’80s get shout-outs on Halloween night this season: We see someone dressed like Jason Voorhees, and new girl Max dresses like the legendary boy who came home, Michael Myers. It’s not only a great way to show that Max is more playful and willing to make friends than her stepbrother, but also to hint that she may be a little more adult and dangerous than the boys. While they’re Ghostbusters, she’s a serial killer.


      The Fury
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      Photo: Courtesy of Netflix
      There’s been a lot written about how much Carrie has influenced Stranger Things, but the impact of another Brian De Palma film has been under-explored. In a 1978 flick called The Fury, the government kidnaps children and turns them into psychics, and its influence is impossible to avoid this season as we learn more about Eleven’s past — and that she has at least one psychic sister in Kali.


      Ghostbusters
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      Photo: Jackson Davis/Netflix
      The kids are right, nobody wants to be Winston. Of course, this is one of the most literal references of Stranger Things 2 in that the kids dress up like three-quarters of everyone’s favorite ’80s ghostbusting crew, but there are also nods to the movie throughout the season, including when Dustin catches Dart in a ghost trap, not unlike his very own Slimer.


      The Goonies
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      Photo: Courtesy of Netflix
      The first season of Stranger Things owed so much to the “child adventure” structure of The Goonies that of course it’s an also influence on season two, which doubles down by casting an actual cast member from the film in a crucial role. Some viewers may think of Samwise when they see Sean Astin, but he will always be Mikey to a generation of ’80s movie fans. In the fifth episode, Astin even slips in a literal reference to his iconic role when he asks, “What’s at the X? Pirate treasure?” Astin reportedly came up with the line himself. As sad as it is to see Bob Newby go, at least Stranger Things 2gives Mikey one last treasure hunt.


      Gremlins
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      Photo: Courtesy of Netflix
      If Dart isn’t exactly like E.T., he’s more like one of the adorable title characters from the Joe Dante classic — a creature that starts cute but gets deadly. Much like Ghostbusters, Gremlins actually came out the summer of 1984, the year Stranger Things 2 takes place. It’s pretty likely that the boys of Hawkins saw it and loved it, meaning Dustin should have known better than to take home something he didn’t understand.


      It
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      Photo: Courtesy of Netflix
      The Stephen King classic pops up again and again through all 17 episodes of Stranger Things, whether it’s just the imagery of the boys riding bikes through a small town or the fact that Bob tells a story about having clown nightmares. And then there’s the end of the season, which drops the boys into a tunnel that definitely feels designed to recall the climax of King’s book. Stranger Things owes a huge nod to King, but the way the horror master considers childhood trauma and power in It is essentially the Rosetta Stone for the Netflix hit.


      John Hughes
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      Photo: Courtesy of Netflix
      The Halloween party where Nancy gets deeply intoxicated has a bit of the ’80s master of teen cinema in it, but it’s the Snow Ball that really feels pulled from something like Pretty in Pink or Sixteen Candles. Also, the social array of heroes this season — from Nancy to Steve to Jonathan to Dustin — has echoes of The Breakfast Club, and we’re not even getting into how much Eleven looks like Ally Sheedy after her punk makeover in Chicago.

      A Nightmare on Elm Street
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      Photo: Courtesy of Netflix
      When Eleven pushes through the membrane of the Upside Down back to the real world, it definitely recalls the way Freddy Krueger violates the space between the dreamscape and reality. There’s also an element of Wes Craven’s classic in the way the Mind Flayer controls Will Byers and works its way into his thoughts. The Mind Flayer and Freddy Krueger are probably buddies.


      Poltergeist
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      Photo: Courtesy of Netflix
      There was nothing creepier in the ’80s than a staticky television in a dark room. It’s rare for a movie to effectively impact the way we view harmless items, but we all know what happened to Carol Anne when she used the television as a portal to a supernatural world. The Duffer Brothers pay direct homage to Poltergeist by having Eleven sit in front of a staticky TV in much the same position as the classic horror character. Of course, the visual allusion is stronger because the first season of the show is basically a riff on Poltergeist itself — the netherworld in which Carol Anne is held captive is very similar to that which holds Will Byers in season one.


      Punky Brewster
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      Photo: Courtesy of Netflix
      When Eleven, Kali, and her gang of X-friends go to find the man who helped Dr. Brenner keep them captive, they catch him watching Punky Brewster, which is way more than just an era-specific show this poor schlub might be enjoying. It’s a show that just so happens to be about a young girl adopted by a grumpy old man, à la Eleven and Hopper. And the specific episode that he’s watching? It’s one in which Punky discusses having to go to the doctor. Every piece of pop culture on this show is very specifically chosen.


      The Road Warrior
      When we heard that the premiere of Stranger Things 2 was called “Madmax,” it was clear how much the Duffers were going to double down on the nostalgic aspect of the show. Of course, they subvert the reference to the George Miller classic by making Max a young woman, but it doesn’t feel coincidental that we so often see Max in fast cars, even if they’re often driven by her sociopathic stepbrother.


      Stand by Me
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      Photo: Courtesy of Netflix
      This year’s most unexpected bromance comes in the form of Dustin and Steve, and Stranger Things 2 hits another Stephen King touchstone during the sequence in which the pair walk along the Hawkins train tracks. As Steve doles out advice about how to woo girls and reveals his love for Farrah Fawcett hairspray, the boys walk the rails in such a way that you almost expect them to stumble across a body.


      Star Wars
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      Photo: Courtesy of Netflix
      Eleven’s saga in Stranger Things 2 very purposefully recalls that of George Lucas’s Holy Trilogy, from the way she moves a train in Chicago like Luke learning how to use the Force by moving an X-Wing to the way she chokes the former Hawkins Lab goon like she’s Darth Vader. The arc of Stranger Things 2 is not unlike Star Wars, too, in the way Eleven learns to harness her powers and return to Hawkins to save her friends rather than choose the “dark side” of revenge. Does this mean there will be Ewoks in Stranger Things 3?


      Stranger Things
      The writers of Stranger Things 2 cleverly make reference to the biggest criticism of their own show in episode five when Lucas tells Max the entire arc of season one, and his new love interest doesn’t believe him, claiming that the story was “a little derivative” and wishing that it were more “original.”


      The Warriors
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      Photo: Courtesy of Netflix
      The look of Kali and her gang of punk outsiders that Eleven meets in Chicago has very clearly been modeled on that of the heroes and villains of Walter Hills 1979 classic. If you think fashion was weird in the ’70s, check out this street-gang odyssey, and try not to shout “Warriors, come out and plaaaayyyyy” when Eleven, Kali, and their buddies are trying to act cool and dodge the police.

    The opening scene of "Stranger Things 2" takes place at the Palace Arcade.

    [​IMG]
    Mike, Dustin, Lucas, and Will all go to the arcade with their spare quarters.
    Netflix
    The Duffer Brothers lifted that arcade name from the 1983 movie "WarGames."
    [​IMG]
    The arcade as seen in "WarGames."
    United Artists
    "WarGames" is a sci-fi film centered around the Cold War and the idea of a computer game getting conflated with a nuclear weapons control system.

    In an interview with Vulture, Ross Duffer said this was his favorite 80s reference of the opening "Madmax" episode.

    "WarGames" was also one of the VHS tapes Jonathan rented for movie night at the Byers' house.
    [​IMG]
    The options were "Mr. Mom," "WarGames," or "Twilight Zone: The Movie."
    Netflix
    Both "WarGames" and "Twilight Zone: The Movie" (1983) fit with the general themes of "Stranger Things 2," focusing on the public's fear of a Russian threat as well as the supernatural elements of the Upside Down.

    On Halloween night, Steve and Nancy dressed up as the main characters in Tom Cruise's 1983 movie "Risky Business."
    [​IMG]
    Steve Harrington (Joe Keery) and Nancy Wheeler (Natalia Dyer).
    Netflix
    Steve and Nancy's choice to go as Joel and Lana from "Risky Business" was not only very topical for a 1984 Halloween party, but also referenced their season one relationship.

    Back on the first season, Steve had commented on Nancy's poster of Tom Cruise hanging in her bedroom.
    [​IMG]
    Tom Cruise and Rebecca De Mornay as Joel and Lana in "Risky Business."
    Warner Bros.
    Steve said he was once told he looked like Tom Cruise, and later invited Nancy to go see a new movie starring the young actor called "All The Right Moves" (which also premiered in 1983).

    Just as on the first season, "Stranger Things 2" made plenty of references to Steven Spielberg's 1982 movie "E.T."
    [​IMG]
    Hopper (David Harbour) and Eleven (Millie Bobby Brown).
    Netflix
    Eleven asks Hopper if she can go trick-or-treating on Halloween night dressed as a ghost.

    This was a direct callback to how Eleven is a parallel character to the titular extraterrestrial in "E.T."
    [​IMG]
    "E.T." itself made many "Star Wars" references.
    Universal Pictures
    In "E.T.," the kids dress up the alien like a ghost in order to sneak him away from their home on Halloween night. Back on season one, a similar parallel was drawn when Mike and the boys put Eleven in a wig a dress — just as the character Gertie did to E.T. in the movie.

    Later on "Stranger Things 2," there's even a small statue of E.T. next to the terrarium where Dustin keeps Dart.
    [​IMG]
    Not the most subtle, but a reference all the same.
    Netflix
    You can also see a small "Ghostbusters" sign behind the E.T. figurine.

    Will said his favorite candy was Reese's Pieces — yet another "E.T." reference made by the series.
    [​IMG]
    Will Byers (Noah Schnapp) on episode one, "Madmax."
    Netflix
    When Dr. Owens asked Will to choose a "desert island" candy, he struggled to come up with an answer. Joyce told Will to just say Reese's Pieces.

    Reese's Pieces was the iconic candy choice Elliot fed to E.T. in order to gain his trust.
    [​IMG]
    Elliot and a bag of Reese's in "E.T."
    Universal Pictures
    In addition to the candy choice, there might have been another tie-in to "E.T." when the Mind Flayer possesses Will.

    Similar to how Elliot and E.T. became physically connected, so that their health mirrors one another, Will's survival becomes temporarily linked to the Mind Flayer's existence.

    Speaking of Dr. Owens, his character was meant to evoke the 1986 "Aliens" movie sequel.
    [​IMG]
    Dr. Owens (Paul Reiser) runs Hawkins Lab on season two.
    Netflix
    Dr. Owens is played by Paul Reiser, who had a very similar role in "Aliens."

    Reiser played Carter Burke, an untrustworthy and manipulative corporate representative who sends the main character Ripley into danger.
    [​IMG]
    Reiser as Carter Burke in "Aliens."
    20th Century Fox
    Reiser told Entertainment Weekly that The Duffer Brothers wanted "Stranger Things" viewers to mistrust Dr. Owens because of Reiser's "Aliens" characters.

    "I think part of what they were tickled by was, to whatever extent people know me from 'Aliens,' they're automatically going, 'Oh this guy is no good,'" Reiser said.

    Dr. Owens ultimately winds up being a well-intentioned man, but the tension was definitely there throughout the early episodes.

    Another '80s character homage was the way Billy's style matched Rob Lowe's character (also named Billy) in the 1985 drama "St. Elmo's Fire."
    [​IMG]
    Billy (Dacre Montgomery) on "Stranger Things" and Billy (Rob Lowe) in "St. Elmo's Fire."
    Netflix/Columbia Pictures
    Newcomer Billy was sporting an impressively committed mullet and single earring. His look a dead-on replication of Lowe's character in "St. Elmo's Fire."

    Will Byers looking out his door was a callback to "Close Encounters of the Third Kind."
    [​IMG]
    People noticed this reference immediately on the "Stranger Things 2" trailers.
    Netflix
    This scene came early on the season, when Will woke up in the middle of the night and was drawn outside by the Mind Flayer.

    "Close Encounters of the Third Kind" was one of Spielberg's earliest explorations of alien life and communication between worlds.
    [​IMG]
    This shot was in many promotional trailers and posters for "Close Encounters."
    Columbia Pictures
    The first season of "Stranger Things" also had its fair share of "Close Encounters" references, particularly with the way Joyce Byers used lights to communicate with Will in the Upside Down.

    The entire plotline of Dustin finding a baby Demogorgon and feeding it was an homage to "Gremlins."
    [​IMG]
    D'Artagnan, or Dart, was not the cute little pollywog Dustin thought he was.
    Netflix
    The inspiration of "Gremlins," a 1984 movie about a boy whose pet turns out to be a destructive monster if you accidentally get it wet or feed it after midnight, was embedded in Dustin's season two storyline from the beginning.

    The Duffer Brothers said Dustin stumbling upon a seemingly innocuous monster was one of their first ideas for season two.
    [​IMG]
    Gizmo, the original mogwai/gremlin in the movie.
    Warner Bros.
    "I love 'Gremlins,'" Matt Duffer told Vulture. "I also love 'Gremlins 2.' I think it's just a really great series. Aside from Will being possessed, that story line was always baked into our first idea: a boy and his monster, Dustin finding a creature that will grow."

    Everyone's favorite police chief, Hopper, had several more Indiana Jones moments this season.
    [​IMG]
    Hopper (David Harbour) and Indiana Jones (Harrison Ford) have a lot in common.
    Netflix/Paramount
    "Stranger Things 2" is set in 1984, the same year "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom" hit theaters. Hopper's brown police chief hat is already reminscent of Indiana Jones' iconic look. But when season two's Hopper also cut the arm off one of his sleeves, it was a clear nod to the "Temple of Doom" sequel.

    Sean Astin's character made a reference to "The Goonies" during one crucial scene.
    [​IMG]
    Sean Astin played Bob Newby, Joyce's kind and tech-savvy boyfriend.
    Netflix
    Astin starred as the young Mikey in "The Goonies," a classic 1985 movie about a group of kids who find a pirate's treasure map.

    When Joyce was asking Bob to help discern the meaning behind Will's drawings so they could find Hopper, Bob asked: "What's at the X, pirate treasure?"

    Astin's character Mikey led his friends on the pirate treasure hunt in "The Goonies."
    [​IMG]
    Astin was 13 years old in "The Goonies."
    Warner Bros.
    According to Astin, The Duffer Brothers were careful when casting him in "Stranger Things 2" because they were worried it'd be too on the nose.

    Astin told Vanity Fair that one of the brothers said, "What we liked on the audition was that you really fit the part, but we didn't want it to be a gimmick."

    But clearly they couldn't help themselves when it came to the pirate treasure reference.

    The boys dressing up as "Ghostbusters" was obvious, but you might not have noticed the way Lucas' line later on the season was a second nod to this movie.
    [​IMG]
    Lucas Sinclair (Caleb McLaughlin) on episode eight, "The Mind Flayer."
    Netflix
    When Dustin and Max are waiting in the Byers' house to see if Joyce can communicate with Will without giving away their position, Lucas says it'll be "Judgment Day" if the Demodogs are sent after them.

    This was a callback to Ross Duffer's favorite scene from "Ghostbusters" between Ray and Winston.
    [​IMG]
    "Ghostbusters" premiered in 1984.
    Columbia Pictures
    In this car scene, Ray and Winston talk about how they could be in the middle of a biblical Judgment Day.

    On episode two of Netflix's "Beyond Stranger Things" talk show, Ross Duffer said this scene is why they wrote in Lucas' "Judgment Day" line on episode eight.

    "[Winston] has my favorite scene which is the scene where he and Ray are talking about Judgement Day in the car," Duffer said. "Which is why we give Lucas the line about Judgment Day in episode eight."
     
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  15. Tiger Roll

    Tiger Roll
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    allergic to jean shorts

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    Better reference list than the previous - for anyone curious. I believe there are 49 in total. Wouldn't let me copy and paste the actual pictures, so I inserted the link.

    Pretty awesome that the arcade from the second season was a laundromat that they bought, gutted and turned into a full-functioning arcade.


    Stranger Things 2 Has More '80s References Than You Could Ever Spot Yourself

    Created by GameSpot Staff on November 1, 2017

    https://www.gamespot.com/gallery/stranger-things-2-has-more-80s-references-than-you/2900-1582/32/
     
  16. OpenMouthKissedaHorseOnce

    OpenMouthKissedaHorseOnce
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    Well that was fucking awesome. I noticed a few of those but I missed a lot of the references shown.
     
  17. mooser3586

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    So I'm 3 episodes into ST2 and bored out of my mind. I enjoyed season 1...currently at a loss for words since many people were calling this the best season of a series ever.
     
  18. Adam

    Adam
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    You should get your serotonin levels checked
     
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  19. u jelly

    u jelly
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    From episode 5 on it's fantastic. Minus, of course, episode 7.
     
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  20. Dirty Ears Bill

    Dirty Ears Bill
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    Episode 7 is good. How can anyone not like an episode fixated on Eleven and her character development?
     
  21. Adam

    Adam
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    :contused:
     
  22. J_E

    J_E
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    God Bless Dabo

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    I watched all of it but wasn’t impressed as much as others. I thought it was somewhat lackluster.
    What do I know though, I’m not a show critic.
     
  23. Dirty Ears Bill

    Dirty Ears Bill
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    :kanye:
     
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  24. Cutig

    Cutig
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    My name is Rod, and I like to party
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    That episode wasn’t close to the quality of the show. They tested a spin-off and it just wasnt up to par. 3/10 will not watch
     
  25. Cutig

    Cutig
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    My name is Rod, and I like to party
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    Looking forward to Punisher on Friday
     
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  26. Codename Duchess

    Codename Duchess
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    They weren't testing a spinoff. They were expanding on the mythology of the show so they don't spend 5 seasons in Hawkins regurgitating the same stuff.
     
  27. Adam

    Adam
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    Matt Duffer: This episode was always locked in at [chapter] seven. I don’t know why. It was always that we were going to have this climax at the lab with the dogs coming out of the hall, and we thought it would either be cool or really annoying to step away for an episode. We wanted to try to do a stand-alone episode, basically. Eleven is not in six, and not in much of eight, so the idea was to give her her own little mini-movie.

    It was sort of like a pilot, but there was no intention to do a spinoff or anything. But it does feel like that. It’s a totally different show embedded within the show. Because we wanted Eleven to have her own journey and have this journey of self-discovery or whatever, that’s why we did it. When we got to the point of writing the episode, we wanted to see if we really needed it or not. We actually did toy with pulling the episode completely, but then the ending with Eleven didn’t work at all. It just didn’t land at all. Then we ended up deciding we needed it.

    Eleven is trying to figure out where she belongs in this world. She doesn’t belong with the boys because she can’t exist with them without putting them in danger. Her existence with Hopper, which seemed promising at first — this is a guy she believed would protect her and help her find her way back in the world — is seemingly failing. She’s really at a loss. She goes to her mother, but she’s not there, basically. So that’s not a home for her. Basically, it’s her looking for a home.


    The Episode’s Unique Tone
    Ross: I think that’s one of the reasons we wanted to do [the episode]. It allows you to play with the tones that we never would’ve been able to explore within Hawkins.
    Matt: It’s the urban films of the ’70s and ’80s, really. The idea was, “Okay, this gives us an excuse to play in that sandbox for a little bit.” There’s a little bit of Terminator, the original one specifically, in there, which was such a grungy, urban sci-fi film.
    Ross Duffer: But the idea is, if she’s going to do this and we’re going to do this episode, she needs to learn something that allows her to succeed at the end. We wanted a lot of the season to be about the trauma and pain these people have suffered from, and actually about confronting that pain in order to heal the wounds, which takes the shape of this giant and continuing-to-grow rift between our world and the Upside Down.






    Will Kali Appear in Future Episodes?
    Matt: I don’t know. That’s something we’re figuring out. It feels a little bit like a loose end if we don’t. If Eleven feels the need to seek her out, she can. It’s definitely something that’s a little bit open-ended that we could or could not revisit.

    Ross: Always the challenging thing — what we found with season two was that we wanted to introduce all these new people and we were excited about it, and explaining the world, but you also want time to be able to spend with your core characters that you’ve grown up with. You want to go into Lucas’s house so you can meet his amazing sister.

    Eight hours, when you have this many characters, it’s not a ton of time. That’s what we’re figuring out now as we move into season three: Who do we want to bring into this world and focus on?

    Matt: If anything, we want to streamline the show. We don’t want it to get too unwieldy.

    Ross Duffer: But the idea is, if she’s going to do this and we’re going to do this episode, she needs to learn something that allows her to succeed at the end. We wanted a lot of the season to be about the trauma and pain these people have suffered from, and actually about confronting that pain in order to heal the wounds, which takes the shape of this giant and continuing-to-grow rift between our world and the Upside Down.
     
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  28. Styx

    Styx
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    I enjoyed the hell out of season 2. Episode 7 was sub par, but the rest was good. I disagree with the need to expand it beyond Hawkins. Doing so simply creates a different show, thus the spinoff. To me, the show is all about the kids involved, Dungeons and Dragons references, and the sexual tension between Wynona Ryder and Hopper. It is a really enjoyable show for me. It can't last more than another season or 2.

    My very small complaints with season 2 are simple and irrelevant. Demogorgon was nearly indestructible season 1, as it should be based on the counterpart in 80s Dungeons and Dragons. Season 2 makes the same creature, although juvenile, into a sub/pack creature(dog like) and makes the Mind Flayer the badass creature? That doesn't follow. Season 3 will need some better procession to continue the Dungeons and Dragons line. Orcus or Asmodeus or Baalzebul or Tiamat perhaps for the next personification of the other plane problem.

    Good show though.
     
  29. mooser3586

    mooser3586
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    Just finished episode 4 and I'm slightly more intrigued than before, so that's an improvement I guess.
     
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  30. haywood jablowme

    haywood jablowme
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    Watching the documentary series “captives”. Pretty intense stuff.
     
  31. u jelly

    u jelly
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    TIL Styx was a Dungeons and Dragons nerd as a kid
     
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  32. Dirty Ears Bill

    Dirty Ears Bill
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    Any of y'all watch Beyond Stranger Things? They explain a lot of stuff like why they went with the Mind Flayer, why they brought in Billy, the thinking behind episode 7, etc.
     
  33. Styx

    Styx
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    Man I enjoyed that shit as a 10 year old kid. My cousins and I would play it on holidays and weekends when the family got together, after we played outside and shot fireworks and shit. I loved it back then. That probably led me to love Tolkien, Robert Jordan, etc to this day. I just started watching Game of Thrones and I guarantee I will read the books and all of that began back then.

    I am still a hardass that prefers hunting dogs and cussing mutherfuckers and football. But I loved arcades and D&D as a kid. Stranger Things is great, but especially for my background of the time period.
     
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  34. HIIMTROYMCcLURE

    HIIMTROYMCcLURE
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    You should read GOT before you watch it. Brandon Sanderson, the guy who finished Wheel of Time, is really good.
     
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  35. Styx

    Styx
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    Started. Seasons 1-3. Fantastic.
     

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