DVU BBQ thread - This one won't go up in smoke

Discussion in 'DVU' started by Billdozer, Jul 20, 2015.

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  1. Billdozer

    Billdozer
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    RCUSA Original

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    The TMB BBQ OP, with regards to @HotButteredGrits and @TheTigerMan

    Here's a summary of favorite things from the old thread:

    A. Recipes:

    1. buy_dont_lease - roasted poblano and corn slaw

    1 medium head cabbage, cored and sliced (I used the food processor)
    1 ear corn, grilled and kernels cut from the cob (allow to cool before combining)
    2 poblano peppers, grilled, stemmed, seeded, and diced to size of corn kernels (allow to cool before combining)
    1 red onion, sliced

    In a separate bowl, combine the following:

    1 cup mayo (after years of wayward living, I only use Duke's brand)
    1 tbsp champagne vinegar
    1 lime, juiced
    1 bunch chopped cilantro
    1/4 tbsp white pepper
    1/8 tsp salt

    Whisk dressing to combine and dress the slaw with the the dressing. Refrigerate at least a few hours before serving.

    2. a.tramp 's "butt stuff"

    butt stuff
    1c corse kosher
    1c corse black pepper
    1c turbinado
    1c brown sugar
    1/2c garlic powder
    1/2c cup spanish paprika
    1/2c cumin
    1/4c cayenne
    1/4c chile powder

    3. apple slaw

    1/2 head cabbage medium chopped
    2 carrots peeled & corse grated
    2 fuji apples pealed, cored & julienned (toss with lemon juice to keep from browning)
    1/2 bunch green onions finely minced

    1/2 cup hellman's
    1/8 cup cider vinegar
    1/6 cup honey
    1/8 cup poppy seeds
    whisk to a froth
    s&p to taste
    4. Pepper Stout Beef - http://wolfepit.blogspot.com/2009/10/pepper-stout-beef.html
    http://www.mmmgoblubbq.com/2013/05/coming-soon-pepper-stout-beef.html
    5. Beef short ribs – a.tramp


    6. No knead bread

    3 cups (430g) flour
    ¼ teaspoon (1g) yeast
    1¼ teaspoon (8g) salt
    1½ cups (345g or 12oz) water
    1 tablespoon honey (optional)
    olive oil (for coating)
    extra flour, wheat bran, or cornmeal (for dusting)

    Equipment:

    Two medium mixing bowls
    6 to 8 quart pot with lid (Pyrex glass, Le Creuset cast iron, or ceramic)
    Wooden Spoon or spatula (optional)
    Plastic wrap
    Two or three cotton dish towels (not terrycloth)

    Process:

    Mix all of the dry ingredients in a medium bowl. Add water and incorporate by hand or with a wooden spoon or spatula for 30 seconds to 1 minute. Lightly coat the inside of a second medium bowl with olive oil and place the dough in the bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let the dough rest 12 hours at room temperature (approx. 65-72°F).

    Remove the dough from the bowl and fold once or twice. Let the dough rest 15 minutes in the bowl or on the work surface. Next, shape the dough into ball. Generously coat a cotton towel with flour, wheat bran, or cornmeal; place the dough seam side down on the towel (or on cutting board) and dust with flour. Cover the dough with a cotton towel and let rise 1-2 hours at room temperature, until more than doubled in size.

    Preheat oven to 450°F. Place the pot in the oven at least 30 minutes prior to baking to preheat. Once the dough has more than doubled in volume, remove the pot from the oven, spray with PAM and place the dough in the pot seam side up. Cover with the lid and bake 35 minutes Then remove the lid and bake 5 minutes uncovered, until the loaf is nicely browned.
    7. buy_dont_lease Habanero Lime Slaw for fish/shrimp tacos

    1 medium head red cabbage, cored and sliced
    3-4 medium carrots shredded in the food processor (or 2-3 cups of bagged shredded carrot)
    Set aside in a bowl. Then:
    2 habanero peppers, seeded and diced
    1 clove garlic diced
    pinch of salt
    Work the above ingredients into a paste on your cutting board using the side of your knife (or using a mortar and pestle)
    In a separate, smaller bowl, combine the following:
    1 cup mayo (Duke's)
    Habanero garlic paste (I suppose you could sub the habanero paste out for some good, pure habanero sauce like Yellowbird or Secret Aardvark in a pinch)
    1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
    1 lime, juiced
    1 bunch chopped cilantro
    1/2 tbsp celery seed
    1/4 tbsp black pepper
    1/8 tsp salt (if needed)
    Whisk dressing to combine and dress the slaw with the the dressing. Refrigerate at least a few hours before serving.
    8. Roasted Pepper Red Potato Salad:

    1. Cut 2 lbs of red potatoes in bite size pieces. Boil until desired doneness
    2. Broil 1 jalapeño and 2 bell peppers (I used orange and red. Fuck green) until the outside starts to char
    3. Put the peppers in a food processor with 1/3 cup olive oil, 1 tbsp light mayo, 2 tbsp creamy Dijon mustard, 1 tsp paprika, 1 tsp dried dill, 1 tbsp garlic powder, 2 tsp sherry, 1 tsp salt. Blend until creamy consistency.
    4. Cut up stalk of celery and add to potatoes.
    5. Chip of half Vidalia onion and sautée in butter until lightly browned.
    6. Add onion to celery and potatoes.
    7. Pour the dressing over the potatoes until desired cover achieved.
    8. Garnish with green onion
    9. Chill in fridge for an afternoon

    9. THE DREAM LOAF:

    ½ stick (4 tablespoons) unsalted butter
    1¼ cups finely chopped onions
    1 medium red bell pepper, finely chopped (about 1 cup)
    ¼ cup sliced green onion
    2 garlic cloves, minced
    2 eggs, beaten
    a cup canned beef broth
    1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
    1 tablespoon hot pepper sauce
    1 tablespoon soy sauce
    1 pound ground beef
    ½ pound ground pork
    ½ pound ground veal
    4 ounces Monterey Jack cheese, grated (about 1 cup)
    ¾ cup saltine cracker crumbs
    ½ cup ketchup
    3 tablespoons Picka-Peppa sauce (optional)
    5 slices thick-cut bacon, halved crosswise

    1. In a large skillet, melt the butter over medium heat. When it foams, add the onions, bell pepper, green onion and garlic. Cover and cook 5 minutes. Uncover and cook, stirring often, for another 4 or 5 minutes, or until the vegetables are lightly browned. Remove from the heat and cool to room temperature.
    2. Position a rack in the middle of the oven and heat the oven to 350 degrees.
    3. In a medium bowl, whisk together the eggs, beef broth, Worcestershire sauce, hot pepper sauce and soy sauce until well-blended.
    4. In a large bowl, combine the ground beef, pork and veal with the onion mixture, the egg mixture, cheese, and cracker crumbs. Mix lightly but thoroughly.
    5. Transfer the meat mixture to a shallow baking dish and shape it into a loaf about 3 inches thick; smooth the top with the back of a spoon. Mix the ketchup and Picka-Peppa sauce (if you’re using it) and spread evenly over the loaf. Arrange the bacon strips atop the ketchup sauce, overlapping them slightly if necessary.

    10. Alabama White BBQ Sauce:

    3/4 cup mayonnaise
    1/3 cup apple cider vinegar
    1/4 cup lemon juice
    1/4 cup apple juice
    1 tablespoon powdered garlic
    1 tablespoon prepared horseradish from a jar (either in vinegar or creamy)
    1 tablespoons coarsely ground black pepper
    1 teaspoon mustard powder
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    1/2 teaspoon finely ground cayenne pepper
    Combine all the ingredients in a large bowl and refrigerate in a jar for at least 2 hours

    11. Honey-Orange Broccoli Slaw

    2 (12 oz) packages broccoli coleslaw mix
    8 slices thick cut bacon, sliced thin, cooked (reserve 2 Tbsp fat for dressing)
    1/2 red onion, julienned
    1/2 C honey roasted peanuts
    4 green onion, bias cut

    Dressing:

    1/4 C cider vinegar
    2 Tbsp honey
    2 Tbsp orange zest
    1 tsp salt
    1/2 tsp pepper
    1/2 C olive oil
    2 Tbsp bacon fat

    1. Combine all ingredients other than dressing.
    2. Toss with dressing just before serving.
    12. Duval's Cajun Rub Recipe

    5 Tablespoons kosher salt
    3 Tablespoons cayenne pepper
    1.5 Tablespoons garlic powder
    .5 Tablespoon poultry seasoning
    4 Tablespoons butter salt
    8 Tablespoons creole seasoning
    4 Tablespoons Season-all
    .5 Tablespoon paprika
    .5 Tablespoon oregano
    1 Tablespoon hickory smoked salt
    2 Tablespoons Italian dry seasoning
    2 Tablespoons celery salt
    .5 Tablespoon accent

    This should be enough for about three birds.

    13. dblplay1212 Tritip instructions:

    Rub as you would a steak. 50/50 salt and pepper works well. Smoke at 275 until it hits 118. Normally takes 45 minutes to an hour. Take off heat and bring your cooker up to searing temps. Sear each side for roughly 2 minutes. If you want fancy grill marks, rotate 45 degrees after 1 minute on each side. After 2 minutes at high temps, pull and check temp. You're looking for 122-ish. Anywhere 122-127 is fine. Pull and tent to rest. Temp will rise a little during rest. After rest, cut against the gain and enjoy.

    The grain of tritip:

    [​IMG]
    14. Whole bunch of stuff from Taques

    charro beans

    Soak 1-2 lbs (2 lbs is a lot of beans) of beans overnight in a huge pot covered with 2-3 inches of water as they will absorb it.

    This next part is the most important, after this you can virtually do anything you want and they will turn out ok......

    The next morning or after about 8 hrs. of soaking, drain the beans in a collander and put back in cook pot and cover with water. Turn the burner on high and set a timer for 30 mins. When the timer goes off they should be just simmering and starting to boil.

    Drain them again in a collander. This gets rid of the really gassy part of the liquid and makes them cook at the next stage perfectly.

    Then I usually sweat lots of chopped onion and garlic in olive oil (in the cooking pot). Then I add my spices, like cumin (1 tsp), chili powder (1tbsp), garlic powder (1 tbsp), paprika (1 tsp) and black pepper (1tbsp).

    Let that mixture cook a couple of minutes to bring out the oils in the spices.

    Then you can add a can of chopped tomatoes.

    Then add back the beans and cover with chicken stock and water (about 1/2 and 1/2).

    Add a chunk of salt pork, or bunch of bacon or the best is leftover ham bone from honey ham.

    Bring to boil on high then turn down to low to simmer for 3 hours.

    Taste and salt accordingly. *Always use coarse Kosher salt for cooking. Makes all the difference in the world. It is in the baking isle at HEB.

    mexican style bbq rub

    ½ cup Granulated garlic
    ½ cup New Mexico chili powder
    ½ cup Pasilla chili powder
    2 tbs. Roasted Arbol chili powder (optional)
    2 tbs. Ground cumin
    2 tbs. Ground celery seed
    6 tbs. Onion powder
    1 tbs. Ground Mexican oregano
    1 cup Paprika
    ½ cup Fresh ground black pepper
    2 tbs. Ground coriander

    ham glaze

    1/2 cup apricot preserves
    1/2 cup honey
    2 tablespoons brown sugar
    1 tablespoon Dijon-style mustard
    1 1/2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
    1/2 teaspoon soy sauce
    1/2 teaspoon paprika
    1/4 teaspoon black pepper
    1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper powder
    1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
    1/8 teaspoon cinnamon powder
    1/8 teaspoon sage flakes
    1/16 teaspoon ground cloves

    leftover brisket chili

    - Get a large pot

    - Chop 1/2 pound of bacon slices into chunks and fry until not quite crisp.

    - Add a whole chopped onion and sauté until translucent and bacon is crisp.

    - If you like chopped garlic and/or diced jalapeños, add some in 5 mins after onions.

    - Deglaze pot with 1/2 bottle of Shiner

    - Add rough chopped leftover brisket/beef rib.

    - Add 6 T chili powder, 2 T ground cumin, 2 t mexican oregano and stir well to combine

    - Add 1 can diced tomatoes and stir well

    - Add enough water to cover beef, about 5 cups, bring to boil then turn down to lowest setting

    - Simmer covered for about two hours.

    - Add juice of 1/2 a lime, and salt & black pepper to taste

    - Optional: Add some crushed tortilla chips to thicken

    - Topped with shredded cheddar and fresh chopped sweet onions like the 1015 variety.

    bacon ranch mac & cheese

    1 cup of uncooked macaroni
    4 slice applewood-smoked bacon
    1 tablespoon vegetable oil
    1 tablespoon flour
    1 1/2 2% milk
    1/3 cup condensed cream of mushroom soup
    3/4 cup shredded six-cheese Italian blend
    1 teaspoon onion powder
    1 teaspoon garlic powder
    1 teaspoon chopped fresh dill
    Salt and pepper to taste
    1/8 teaspoon salt Cooking spray
    1/2 cup shredded colby-Jack cheese
    1/2 cup of breadcrumbs

    -Cook pasta
    -Cook bacon, remove bacon from pan, reserving grease. Crumble bacon.
    -Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium heat; sprinkle flour evenly into pan, stirring constantly with a whisk. Add milk and soup to saucepan, and bring to a boil; cook until thick. Remove from heat; let stand 4 minutes or until sauce cools Add Italian cheese blend, onion powder, garlic powder, dill, salt and pepper, stirring until cheese melts. Stir in pasta.
    -Spoon mixture into a baking dish coated with butter and spread bacon throughout. Top with colby-Jack cheese.
    Bake at 350 for twenty minutes.

    chipotle peach bbq sauce

    16 oz can peaches in water, not syrup
    2 cups ketchup
    1 cup apple cider vinegar
    1 cup water
    3 chipotle chiles (i used the canned ones in adobo sauce) minced
    1-2 cloves garlic, minced
    tablespoon each of chile powder, pepper, salt
    2 teaspoons oregano
    3 tablespoons of brown sugar

    creole jambalaya

    (serves 8-10)

    2lbs raw shrimp, peeled
    2 cups raw rice
    1lb andouille sausage
    1/2lb cooked chicken, diced
    1/2lb tasso ham, diced
    1/2 stick butter
    4 tbsp flour
    2 16oz cans beef broth OR 3 cups bouillon
    4 cloves of garlic, minced
    3 medium white onions, finely chopped
    6 scallions (with green leaves), chopped
    4 creole tomatoes, peeled and chopped OR 16oz can of tomatoes, drained and chopped
    1 green bell pepper, chopped
    1 bay leaf
    1/2 tsp thyme leaves
    1/8 tsp ground cumin
    1/8 tsp ground cloves
    1/8 tsp ground allspice
    1/4 tsp cayenne (or more)
    salt and cracked pepper to taste

    Melt butter in pot, cooking sausage and ham until lightly browned and stir in the flour. Add onions, scallions, bell pepper, and garlic, cooking until the vegetables are soft and translucent. Stir in chopped tomatoes and their juice, then adding bay leaf, thyme, cumin, cloves, allspice, cayenne, and black pepper. Add beef broth and mix well. Add raw shrimp and chicken, then stir in the raw rice. Season with salt, approximately a tbsp to start. The liquid in the pot should just cover the contents. Add more broth or bouillon only if necessary. Bring the pot to a boil, then immediately cut the heat very low, covering contents until the rice is done (jambalaya should be damp, not soupy.) Anybody who doesn't have a really good appetite should not be allowed to eat jambalaya (yes, this is the last line of the recipe in the book [​IMG])

    green chile salsa

    I almost forgot this recipe for salsa:

    1/2 lb fresh tomatillo, roasted husked and chopped
    11/2 lb hatch green chili, roasted, seeded and chopped (I leave a couple of them whole to chop into the blended salsa)
    If you use the mild or medium Hatch peppers you might want to add serrano or jalapeno for heat
    3 garlic cloves, chopped
    1 medium onion, diced
    2 quarts water
    1 tablespoon salt (to taste)
    3 tablespoons lime juice, fresh squeezed

    Put all ingredients, except salt and lime juice, in a large kettle and bring to a light boil
    Cook for 30 minutes.
    Strain liquid into a large bowl.
    Place solid ingredients in a blender (I never blend mine smooth)
    Add 1/2 of the strained liquid (about 3 cups) and blend to desired consistency.
    You may have to do this in batches.
    Add the lime juice and salt and blend to taste.

    Again roasting is the key for me. I have even roasted the garlic and onion before boiling. Good stuff.

    green chile stew

    1 lb. ground chuck
    1 lb. ground pork
    1 lb. boneless sirloin, cut into 1/2 inch cubes
    1 stick plus 1 tbsp. unsalted butter
    1 large onion, chopped
    3 garlic cloves, minced
    3/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
    1 1/2 tbsp. Tabasco
    2 1/2 tsp. dried oregano, crumbled
    1 1/2 tbsp. ground cumin
    1/4 cup minced fresh parsley
    2 tsp. freshly ground black pepper
    6 tbsp. all purpose flour
    1 1/2 tsp. kosher salt
    8 cups chicken broth
    3/4 cup Mexican beer (not dark)
    4 lbs. poblano peppers, roasted and chopped
    2 small tomatoes, peeled seeded and chopped
    In a skillet brown the ground beef over moderately high heat and transfer it with a slotted spoon to a kettle.
    In the skillet brown the pork and the sirloin separately, transferring them as they are browned with the slotted spoon to the kettle, and discard the fat remaining in the skillet.
    To the skillet add 3/4 stick of the butter and in it cook the onion, garlic and cilantro over moderately low heat until the onion is softened. Add the Tabasco, oregano, cumin, parsley, black pepper, 3 tbsp. of the flour and salt and cook the mixture, stirring for 3 minutes. Add this mixture to the kettle with the broth, beer, the poblano peppers and the tomatoes, bringing the mixture to a boil, then simmer it, stirring occasionally, for 2 hours.
    Knead together the remaining 3 tbsp. butter and the remaining 3 tbsp. flour to make a beurre manie or roux, add the beurre manie in bits to the kettle, stirring and simmer the chili for 5 minutes. Serves 8.
    Best when reheated!! I cannot stress this enough. Stew will taste 10x better if you refrigerate over night and eat the next day.
    Top with some cheddar cheese and sour cream and you've got one hell of a dish.

    navajo fry bread

    Frybread Recipe

    Ingredients:

    • 4 cups Blue Bird flour or King Arthur Flour

    • 4.5 tsp. Clabber Girl Double Acting Baking Powder

    • 1 tsp. salt

    • 2 cups mildly warm milk
    Vegetable oil for frying

    Directions:

    Mix and knead dough in a bowl with hand until it's not sticky. Dough should be soft and easy to handle. Cover with a towel and let rest at room temperature for 30 minutes. Heat a pan with oil over medium-high heat. You may need to lower your heat a bit as different pans and burners heat differently. Adjust as you go. Hand stretch and pat until it stretches out to about 8". Carefully place dough into the pan away from you. If you place it towards you and let it drop, hot oil can spray you in the face. Keep a fork nearby. Frybread dough will bubble. When it reaches its peak, pop it. You usually only need to do this once. Flip it with golden brown on bottom. Fry until golden brown on the other. Both sides of the dough will look considerably different, but this is normal. Sprinkle a bit of salt on them. Let rest vertical to drain them.

    smoked pork tamales

    Filling:
    4 cups finely shredded pork shoulder


    Red Chili Sauce


    2 1/2 oz Dried Ancho Chiles

    3 cups Hot Water

    1 Large Can Tomato Sauce

    2 cloves Garlic

    1/4 cup Sour Cream

    1 1/2 tsp Salt

    Stem & seed the chiles, then toast them in a dry skillet over medium heat
    Place in a bowl and cover with 3 cups very hot water
    Soak for 20 minutes
    Puree re-hydrated peppers with 1 1/2 cups of the soaking liquid, tomato sauce & minced garlic
    Add sour cream and adjust salt to taste

    *This makes 3 cups of sauce, which is more than you need. Add this sauce to the pork until it is moist, but not too wet. Freeze the extra sauce for up to a year or use it to make enchiladas.

    Batter:
    1 ¼ cups (10 oz) Rendered Lard
    2 lbs Pork Fat


    Ask your butcher to save scraps trimmed from roasts and chops. Don’t use salt pork or bacon fat, as the flavors are too strong.
    Preheat oven to 275 degrees.
    Cut fat into 1 inch cubes and spread it out in a deep baking dish
    Place fat in oven and stir every once in a while until the fat renders into a clear liquid (about 2 hours).
    Let lard cool to lukewarm and strain.

    1 ½ tsp Baking Powder
    2 tsp salt
    4 cups (2 lbs) fresh, coarse ground masa for tamales
    *or* 3 ½ cups dried masa harina mixed with 2 ¼ cups hot water
    1 ½ cup chicken broth

    Beat Lard, baking powder, and salt with an electric mixer on medium-high until light in texture (1 minute)
    Continue beating as you add masa (fresh or reconstituted) in three additions.
    Reduce speed to medium-low and add broth. Continue beating another minute or so, until a ½ tsp dollop of the batter floats in a cup of cold water (if it floats, the tamales will be tender and light).
    Beat in enough of the remaining broth to give the mixture the consistency of cake batter (it should hold its shape in a spoon).
    Taste and add extra salt if you think it needs it.
    You can make this ahead of time, refrigerate for several days, then re-beat with a little broth or water to bring the batter to the soft consistency it had before.

    Corn Husks:
    8 oz package Dried Corn Husks

    soak in hot water for 3-5 hours until pliable
    Choose 24 of the largest and most pliable husks and pat dry, then wrap in a damp dish cloth.

    Making Tamales:

    Lay out one of your chosen corn husks with the tapered end towards you
    Spread ¼ cup batter into about a 4 inch SQUARE in the middle of your husk. Leave at least a 1 ½ inch border at the tapered end.
    Spoon ⅛ cup (2 Tbsp) filling down the center of the batter.
    Pick up the 2 long sides of the corn husk and bring them together (this will cause the batter to surround the filling).
    Roll the excess corn husk around the tamal and fold the 1 ½ inch tapered portion over to close the end, leaving the top open.
    Once you’ve made 6 tamales, stack them together and tie them loosely with a string.

    Steaming Tamales:

    Pour an inch or so of water in a steamer and heat to boiling
    Stand your tamales on their folded ends in the steamer
    Don’t pack the steamer too tightly, because they need room to expand
    Steam at a constant medium heat for 1 ¼ hours, watching to make sure the water doesn’t evaporate. Add more water as needed.
    Tamales are done when husks pull away from the masa easily.
    For the best textured tamales, let them cool completely and re-steam for 15 minutes before serving. However, we usually make these with friends and are a couple beers in and pretty hungry by this point. They are delicious either way.

    Enjoy!

    duvals poultry rub

    1/8 box Kosher Salt
    2.5 tbsp Cayenne
    8 tbsp Garlic Powder
    2.5 tbsp McCormick's BBQ Spice
    3 tbsp Paul Prudhomme's Poultry Seasoning
    1.5 oz Butter Salt
    8 tbsp Tony Chachere's
    5 tbsp Lawry's
    4 tbsp Smoked Paprika
    3 tbsp Oregano
    1 tbsp Italian Dry Seasoning
    4 tbsp Celery Salt
    0.5 oz Accent
    1 tbsp Hickory Smoked Salt

    coffee based rub

    1/3 cup garlic powder
    1 1/2 Tbsp ground cumin
    2 1/3 cup dark brown sugar
    1 Tbsp cayenne pepper
    1/4 cup ground cinnamon
    2 cup ground coffee (espresso grind)
    2 cup kosher salt
    1/2 cup ground black pepper

    mango habanero bbq sauce

    1 tablespoon vegetable oil
    1 small onion, minced (about 1/2 cup)
    2 medium cloves garlic, minced (about 2 teaspoons)
    1 teaspoon grated ginger
    1 1/2 cups roughly chopped peeled fresh mango, about 2 medium magnos
    1 cup mango juice
    1 cup tomato sauce
    1/3 cup dark brown sugar
    1/3 cup honey
    1/3 cup cider vinegar
    2 tablespoons molasses
    2 tablespoons fresh juice from about 2 limes
    1 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
    1 tablespoons yellow mustard
    2 teaspoons finely chopped habanero chiles, seeded (about 2 chilis, see note above)
    2 teaspoons Kosher salt
    1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

    the mayors mustard sauce

    3/4 cup mustard
    1/4 cup honey
    1/3 cup apple cider vinegar
    1 tbs brown sugar
    2 tbs ketchup
    2 tsp worchestire
    1 tsp franks

    coffee bbq sauce

    2 cups brewed coffee
    1 cup ketchup
    ½ cup cider vinegar
    ½ cup brown sugar
    2 Tbls Worcestshire sauce
    2 Tbls chili powder (Mexene)
    1 Tbls granulated onion
    1 Tbls granulated garlic
    1 Tbls ancho chile powder

    Bring all ingredients to a boil then simmer for 15-20 minutes. Stir often to keep solids from settling to the bottom of the pan and burning.

    smokin red roasted potatoes

    8-9 large Red potatoes (about 7-9 ounces each)
    6 Tablespoons Extra Virgin Olive Oil
    Salt & pepper*
    Smoked paprika (regular is fine too)*
    1/4 cup Butter, melted
    Dried tarragon
    Fresh flat leaf parsley, chopped
    Fresh thyme, chopped

    Place each potato in the bowl of a wooden spoon. Using a very sharp knife slice each potato until the knife cannot cut further. This will give you the characteristic sliced look.

    After slicing place the potatoes on a microwave safe dish and cover with wax paper. Cook on high for 12 minutes or until they are easily pierced with a fork.

    Place the potatoes on a baking sheet and drizzle with extra virgin olive oil, trying carefully to include each slice. Sprinkle each potato with salt, pepper and smoked paprika (regular is fine too). Place in a 450 degree oven for 23 minutes or until golden brown.

    Once removed from the oven melt a 1/4 cup butter and drizzle over each potato. Top with tarragon, parsley and thyme.

    *Quantities used for this recipe will vary depending on how much you want to put on each potato.

    These potatoes can also be made with other fresh herbs. Use whatever you like, the possibilities are endless.*Quantities used for this recipe will vary depending on how much you want to put on each potato.

    spicy shrimp marinade

    3 tbs ponzu
    2 tbs of sriracha
    2 tsp of sesame oil
    2 tsp of rice wine vinegar
    1 tbs of brown sugar
    3 tbs of olive oil
    7 cloves of chopped garlic
    2 tbs of onion powder
    2 tbs ginger
    1 tsp of black pepper
    2 tbs of hoisin sauce
    2 tbs of red pepper flakes

    Let them marinade for 2 hours

    jerk chicken

    ½ cup canola oil
    ½ cup lime juice
    4 tbsp. dark brown sugar
    2 tbsp. apple cider vinegar
    2 tbsp. dried thyme
    2 tbsp. soy sauce
    4 tsp. ground allspice
    1 tsp. ground cinnamon
    ½ tsp. ground nutmeg
    1 tsp. ground coriander
    ¼ cup brown sugar
    8 cloves garlic
    8 scotch bonnet chiles, stemmed
    8 scallions, roughly chopped
    2 shallots, roughly chopped
    1 1" piece ginger, peeled and roughly chopped
    Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
    8 whole skin-on, bone-in chicken legs and thighs

    1. Combine the oil, lime juice, sugar, vinegar, thyme, soy sauce, allspice, garlic, chiles, scallions, shallots, ginger, and salt and pepper in the bowl of a food processor and process until smooth. Place chicken in a 9" x 13" baking dish and pour marinade over it; massage marinade into chicken, making sure to push it under the skin. Cover chicken with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 8 hours or overnight.

    2. Build a medium-hot fire in a charcoal grill or heat a gas grill to medium-high. Alternatively, heat a grill pan over medium-high heat. Place chicken on grill over direct heat and cook, turning occasionally, until it begins to brown, about 10 minutes. Transfer chicken to indirect heat, or reduce heat to medium-low, and continue cooking, turning occasionally, until chicken is cooked through, about 45 minutes. To serve, transfer chicken to a plate.

    western north carolina bbq sauce

    2 cups cider vinegar
    ⅔ cup ketchup
    ½ cup brown sugar
    1 tablespoon Tabasco sauce
    1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
    1 teaspoon dry mustard
    1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
    1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    1 teaspoon onion salt

    Combine all of the ingredients in a large saucepan. Simmer for 30 minutes over medium-low heat. Store in an airtight jar in the refrigerator

    15. Myron Mixon stuff (courtesy of dblplay1212)

    injection, rub & glaze

    Injection (quantity is to make 5 quarts for a whole hog. Cut down for a butt, obviously):

    Hog Injection

    4 quarts apple juice
    1 quart distilled white vinegar
    5 pounds sugar
    2 cups salt
    1 cup monosodium glutamate, such as Ac’cent brand flavor enhancer

    Rub:

    Basic BBQ Rub
    Makes 3 cups

    1 cup (packed) light brown sugar
    2 tablespoons chili powder
    2 tablespoons dry mustard
    2 tablespoons onion powder
    2 tablespoons garlic powder
    2 tablespoons cayenne pepper
    2 tablespoons kosher salt
    2 tablespoons coarsely ground black pepper
    Glaze:

    Hog Glaze
    Makes 8 cups

    2 cups Jack’s Old South Vinegar Sauce or Basic Vinegar Sauce: http://Mixo_9780345528544_epub_c02_r1.htm#s8
    2 18-ounce jars apple jelly
    2 cups light corn syrup
    Combine all the ingredients in a blender, and blend until thoroughly combined, about 3 minutes. Pour out into a clean bowl, using a plastic spatula to scrape it all. Store, refrigerated, for up to 2 weeks.

    Vinegar Sauce
    Basic Vinegar Sauce

    Makes about 3.5 cups
    2 cups cider vinegar
    1 cup ketchup
    ½ cup hot sauce
    2 tablespoons salt

    2 tablespoons coarsely ground black pepper
    1 tablespoon red pepper flakes
    ½ cup sugar

    pork butt

    1 18- to 20-pound pork shoulder, including the Boston butt and picnic ham in one cut (this may have to be ordered from a butcher; in many supermarkets the cuts are preseparated)

    1 recipe Hog Injection
    3 cups Jack’s Old South Original Rub, or 1 recipe Basic Barbecue Rub
    1 cup apple juice
    1 recipe Hog Glaze

    Trim away any bone slivers from the exposed meat. Remove any visible excess fat. Square up the long sides of the shoulder to make it neat and uniform.
    Place the pork shoulder in a large aluminum pan. (There’s no skin to hold the liquid in, as there is on a whole hog, so the pan is necessary to catch the excess liquid.) Inject the shoulder with 2 to 3 quarts of the hog injection, all over the shoulder in about 1-inch squares. Let the injected shoulder sit, loosely covered, in the refrigerator for 2 hours.
    Turn the shoulder upside-down in the pan, so that any excess injection that might remain infuses the meat. Let it sit upside-down for 15 to 20 minutes.
    In the meantime, heat a smoker to 250°F.
    Take the shoulder out of the pan and sprinkle the rub all over it, making sure to get the area by the shank. Place the shoulder, in its aluminum pan, in the smoker and cook for 3 hours.
    Remove the shoulder from the smoker. Pour the apple juice into a clean aluminum pan, and transfer the shoulder to the pan. Cover the pan with aluminum foil and place it in the smoker. Cook for 6 hours or until the internal temperature reaches 205°F.
    Remove the pan from the smoker. Discard the foil. Brush the hog glaze all over both sides of the shoulder. Return the shoulder to the pan, put the pan back in the smoker, and cook for 1 more hour while adding no more heat to the smoker and allowing the internal temperature of the smoker to drop. The shoulder will effectively rest in the smoker this way.
    Remove the pan from the smoker, and serve. Where I’m from, a pork shoulder is not sliced—it’s pulled apart in chunks. There are a couple of different ways to do it, with knives and tongs and such, but the very best—and easiest—is with your hands. Wearing heavy-duty gloves, simply pull the meat apart gently and let your guests have at it. You can put it in a sandwich just like this, or you can chop it up after you’ve pulled it, if you like.

    peach pork butt

    SERVES:10 TO 12
    COOKING METHOD:INDIRECT HEAT
    SUGGESTED WOOD:HICKORY, PEACH, PECAN
    COOKING TIME:7 TO 10 HOURS

    When you have a craving for pulled pork but a whole shoulder is more meat than you need, the pork butt is your best option. The butt is not the rear end of a pig but the upper portion of the shoulder. This six- to eight-pound cut is usually well marbled and holds up well during long cooks. Most competition barbecue teams select the pork butt when going for the blue ribbon in the pork category because it has more marbling than the picnic portion of the shoulder and is more easily manageable on the grill than the entire shoulder.
    I created this recipe for a huge neighborhood block party in Birmingham, Alabama. There are only two things that go together better than a barbecue block party and Birmingham, and that is peaches and pork. If you are ever invited to a barbecue in Alabama, pack your overnight bag.

    DRY RUB
    1 TABLESPOON DARK BROWN SUGAR

    1 TABLESPOON TURBINADO OR RAW SUGAR
    1 TABLESPOON PAPRIKA
    2¼ TEASPOONS SALT
    1 TEASPOON GARLIC SALT
    1 TEASPOON BLACK PEPPER
    ¾ TEASPOON CHILI POWDER
    ¼ TEASPOON CELERY SALT
    ¼ TEASPOON GROUND CUMIN
    ¼ TEASPOON CAYENNE PEPPER

    INJECTION
    ¾ CUP PEACH JUICE (DRAINED FROM THE CANNED PEACHES USED IN THE SAUCE, BELOW)
    ¼ CUP GRANULATED SUGAR
    2 TABLESPOONS SALT
    1 TABLESPOON WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE

    1 (6- TO 8-POUND) BONE-IN PORK BUTT

    SAUCE
    2 CUPS MEMPHIS-STYLE CHAMPIONSHIP RED SAUCE
    1 CAN PEACHES IN NATURAL JUICES, DRAINED (JUICES RESERVED) AND CHOPPED

    Build a fire (wood or a combination of charcoal and wood) for indirect cooking by situating the coals on only one side of the grill,
    leaving the other side void.
    In a small bowl, combine the dry rub ingredients. Mix well and set aside. In a separate mixing bowl, combine all the injection ingredients and blend until the sugar dissolves. Using a meat syringe, inject the meat evenly at 1-inch intervals from the top side, using the entire amount of the injection solution. Coat the pork evenly with dry rub, patting gently until the mixture adheres to the meat.
    When the heat reaches 250°F, place the pork butt on the void side of the cooker, close the lid, and cook over indirect heat for 7 to 10 hours, until the internal temperature of the pork reaches 190°F. Continually monitor the grill temperature and add hot charcoal or wood coals as needed, to maintain the cooker temperature of 250°F. Remove the pork to a cutting board and let it rest for 20 minutes.
    In a saucepan, combine the barbecue sauce and chopped peaches and bring to a simmer over medium heat. Reduce the heat to low and simmer for 10 minutes. Slice, pull, or chop the cooked meat into bite-size pieces and serve drizzled with the sauce or pass the sauce on the side.
    16. http://www.williams-sonoma.com/recipe/grilled-flank-steak-salad-tomato.html

    17. TheChad's birthday corn.
    Use silver queen corn if available

    Remove top strip of corn stalk
    Soak in water for 1hr
    Grill indirect stalk down 20 minutes @ 450
    Char top layer directly over coals for about 2-4 minutes
    Top with squeeze butter (it's easier to use)
    Salt, pepper and creole

    18. Prime Rib
    atramp's guide

    Remove from fridge and pat dry with towel. Crush and mince a shitload of garlic (a 6lb
    roast used 10 large cloves) and rub roast liberally sprinkle with rub consisting of 1 part
    coarse kosher, 1 part coarse black pepper & 1/8 part ground rosemary

    Let set for 1-2 hours as it approaches room temp. Smoke at 250 until desired temp is
    reached, a 6 lb roast took right at 4 hours to hit 120, and loosely tent with foil.

    Other guidance:
    http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2009/12/perfect-prime-rib-beef-recipe.html
    http://www.virtualweberbullet.com/standingribroastselect.html

    18. Sauces:

    Aaron Franklin's Vinegar:

    • 1 cup white vinegar
    • 1 cup cider vinegar
    • 1 cup ketchup
    • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
    • 2 tablespoons hot sauce
    • Dash of Worcestershire sauce
    • 2 teaspoons Hungarian paprika
    • Kosher salt and coarse black pepper

    Myron Mixon's Vinegar:
    2 cups cider vinegar
    1 cup tomato puree
    ½ cup Louisiana-style hot sauce or other favorite hot sauce
    2 tablespoons kosher salt
    2 tablespoons freshly ground black pepper
    1 tablespoon red pepper flakes
    ½ cup sugar

    Bobby Flay's Vinegar:

    2 tablespoons canola oil
    2 shallots, finely diced
    4 garlic cloves, finely chopped
    1 cup aged sherry vinegar
    ¼ cup packed dark brown sugar
    1 tablespoon mild Spanish paprika
    1 cup ketchup
    1 cup low-sodium chicken broth
    2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh thyme
    Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
    Clover honey

    “Heat the oil in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the shallots and garlic and cook until softened, 1 minute. Add the vinegar and cook until reduced by half, about 5 minutes. Add the brown sugar, paprika, ketchup, chicken broth, and thyme and cook until reduced by half, about 15 minutes. Season with salt, pepper, and honey to taste. Let cool to room temperature.”

    19. Drew63's Grilled Potato Salad
    http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2015/06/easy-grilled-potato-salad-recipe.html

    Just an excellent recipe. I used more mustard than it called for, and added a bit of fish sauce to the vinaigrette.

    20. Billdozer's No Knead Beer Bread

    1-1/2 teaspoon dry active yeast
    ½ cup warm water
    1/2 cup all purpose flour

    Mix together in a bowl and cover with towel for 30 minutes

    Add
    1 beer
    4 cups all purpose flour
    2 tsp salt
    1 tablespoon of honey

    Form into a ball and cover with a hot, damp towel for 2 hours

    Remove from bowl and form into ball (folding under) using extra flour.

    Place on a baking sheet and cover with towel and rest for 30 minutes.

    Score the top and bake for 35 minutes at 425F.

    Detailed:

    Combine 1 1/2 teaspoon dry active yeast, 1/2 cup all-purpose flour, and 1/2 a cup of warm water. Cover and set a warm place for 30 minutes. Then add 1 12 oz bottle of beer of your preference, 2 teaspoons salt, and roughly 4 cups of flour. Add the last cup of flour slowly to so that the dough dose not become dry. Work into a ball until all the ingredients are combined. Cover with a hot damp towel and set in a warm place for 2 hours. Scrape the dough down from the sides of the bowl and onto a flowered work surface. Pull the edges of the dough down underneath itself until a smooth loaf is formed. Sprinkle flour on top of the loaf. Next, sprinkle cornmeal onto a baking sheet and set the loaf on top. Cover with a dry towel for 30 minutes. Score the top with a knife and bake at 425°F for 35 minutes. Cool to room temperature before cutting.

    B. List of things to buy from Amazon to help the board:

    1. John Henry Pecan rub - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005V66NN6/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A1B7M9EQGNCLQA
    2. Plow boys bbq rub -
      http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002TT46DM/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A3GQ10XHYLXKDR
    3. injector - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000KDZ1VA/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o07_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    4. bottles to serve bbq sauce in - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009LS6HG8/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o06_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    5. chimney starter - http://www.amazon.com/Weber-7416-Ra...1981&sr=8-1&keywords=charcoal chimney starter
    6. maverick thermometer - http://www.amazon.com/Maverick-Prob...28982056&sr=8-3&keywords=maverick thermometer
    7. thermapen - http://www.amazon.com/ThermoWorks-S...UTF8&qid=1428982098&sr=8-2&keywords=thermapen
    8. thermopop - http://www.amazon.com/ThermoWorks-ThermoPop-Super-Fast-Thermometer-Rotating/dp/B00HZVJM4M/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1429012401&sr=8-1&keywords=thermopop
    9. BBQ gloves - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000G1MIJO/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    10. charcoal starter - http://www.amazon.com/Charcoal-Companion-Electric-Starter/dp/B000GFP1TO/ref=sr_1_1?s=lawn-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1429012634&sr=1-1&keywords=charcoal+electric+starter
    11. Weber Smokey Mountain - http://www.amazon.com/Weber-721001-Mountain-18-Inch-Charcoal/dp/B001I8ZTJ0/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1429012746&sr=8-2&keywords=weber+smokey+mountain
    12. Dizzy Pig BBQ Swamp Venom Rub Spice - 7.4 Oz https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005PITA8A/ref=cm_sw_r_awd_Xcqmvb0WJ18SH
    C. Useful websites:

    http://virtualweberbullet.com/cook.html
    http://virtualweberbullet.com/woods.html
    http://www.nakedwhiz.com/WiseOneRecipes.pdf
    http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/
    http://amazingribs.com/
    http://www.seriouseats.com/
    http://www.cookingforengineers.com/
    http://www.slapyodaddybbq.com/category/recipes/
    http://bbqpitboys.com/

    D. Mainboard approved grills/smokers
    http://www.biggreenegg.com/
    http://www.weber.com/grills/series/smokers
    http://www.weber.com/grills/series/original-kettle
    http://www.primogrill.com/
    UDS builds - http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=23436, http://howtobbqright.com/udssmoker.html
    http://langbbqsmokers.com/

    E. Cooking books

    1. Courtesy of Steve Championship


    2. Jerk From Jamaica - Helen Willinsky

    3. TMB Cookbook


    F. Reheating tips

    F.1 NilesIrish butt reheating

    The method I have used several times for getting pulled pork to tailgates. I've had great success with and rave reviews with the following.

    Smoke and pull your pork as you normally would. After it's pulled give it a rough chop to even up the piece size, don't have to go crazy, but it helps later. Pack your pork into loaf size foil pans (about 1 per pound) pan (By the way double the number of pans you think you need). Pack it, refrigerate and make some Carolina vinegar sauce http://www.meatwave.com/blog/barbecue-sauce-recipe-north-carolina-vinegar-sauce

    Day of pack everything up, including extra loaf pans and head out, on arrival, fire the grill to low, fill the extra foil pans with a small amount of water and then place your pork pans in those creating a double boiler, this will keep the meat from scorching, add sauce for flavor and moisture, and voila you'll have almost as good as fresh pulled/chopped pork.

    I also suggest using slider buns for portion control and ease for a tailgate.

    I like the smaller foil pans because you can warm the meat in batches instead of holding all of it over a "high" heat source for a long time, so, they probably aren't necessary, But they work well for a long day.

    F.2 Holding, storing, and reheating BBQ - http://www.virtualweberbullet.com/storing.html


    G. TMB BBQ Recommendations:

    G.1 Tallahassee
    fattmante
    - 4 Rivers Smokehouse. The best place for brisket in town. There are additional 4R around FL (Tampa, Jax, Orlando, Gville), so it's not exactly local. Ribs are great, but the Texas style brisket is the must get there.

    - Mo Betta. This is a large trailer with outdoor seating in the parking lot of a Shell gas station. Mr. Betta has been there for years, making solid pulled pork and ribs. Solid BBQ, but can be hit or miss depending on the day.

    - Piggys. Now, I haven't been since new management took over, but this was a consistently good joint when I'd go. The brisket/pulled pork nachos were very solid.

    - Hamaknockers. This joint is actually in Crawfordville, which is about 30 minutes south of town. Their smoked wings are wonderful, as are the ribs. They make their own sauces as well, which are really good.

    Avoid: Sonny's (chain), Jim and Milts (dry as hell), and Up In Smoke (dry as well, and the sides aren't good).

    G.2 South Florida
    NoleNBlue
    South Florida
    Georgia Pig on 441: Best slaw I've ever had. Hands down. Like, stupid good. Pulled pork is pretty good. Exceptional by South Florida standards. Brunswick stew is so spicy it's almost inedible.

    Dixie Pig on Dixie Highway: Lexington style, aka God's style. Pulled pork is outstanding. They offer several sauces to suit your tastes, however their gold sauce mixed with their hot sauce is my favorite, as their vinegar sauce just doesn't live up to my lofty expectations. They also have hush puppies, which are always appreciated.

    Scruby's: several locations and people from down here swear it's great. I'll eat it, if starving is the other option, but it's not great. Or good, for that matter.

    G.3 Virginia Beach
    NoleNBlue
    Malbon's: located inside Malbon's Citgo on General Boothe Blvd. and owned by one of the oldest family names in Tidewater. Pulled pork is really good and it's no bullshit. They give you no sauce. Sliced white bread, slaw, chips (plain Lays) and some Tabasco. Grew up eating sandwiches from there, along with Pierce's in Lightfoot, when we would go to Busch Gardens or The Pottery.

    R-Co: located inside the random R-Co gas station in Creed's, near the Knott's Island bridge. You'll never have occasion to be out this way but if your car breaks down while you're heading to Moyock, go here. Old lady makes a batch of pulled pork every day (M-F). Just get there early. They have two things: pulled pork sandwich with slaw or pulled pork sandwich without slaw. It's the best BBQ sandwich I've ever had. When they're out, they're out.

    G.4 Upstate SC
    billdozer
    Brasstown BBQ, Brasstown: In the mountains near the Chattooga River and hard to get to, only open Friday and Saturday nights. Everything I've had there is great, the beef, ribs, chicken, and pulled pork.

    The Smokin' Pig, Anderson: Best brisket in the upstate. Pulled pork, ribs, and chicken are pretty good too.

    Pompous Pig, Anderson: Decent pulled pork and good beans.

    Sardi's Den, Clemson: I used to love their ribs until I started making my own. Now they have dropped in my opinion. It seems like they boil their ribs.

    G.5 Jacksonville
    dblplay1212
    1. 4 Rivers (Jax) - Just damn good Q. Brisket, pork, chicken, turkey, they do it all well. Sides are the shit. They also have a killer bakery.

    2. G's Slow Smoked BBQ (Middleburg) - Local guy that raped the contest circuit around here opened his own spot. More homey feel than 4 Rivers. Somes you go in and they are out of this or that. That's part of them cooking it fresh daily so I don't complain.

    3. Southern Soul BBQ (St Simon Island) - Just had it recently for the first time. Place has been on Diners, Drive Inns, and Dives. Owner was on BBQ Pitmasters, too. Everything we had was solid. I'd give their meat a B+ but their sauces were an A++. Picked up a couple bottles on my way out.

    4. Smokin' D's BBQ (St Augustine) - Very small location with the only seating being outside. Kinda like G's in that sometimes they are out of things but again I'm ok with that.

    5. Mojo (several locations in Jax) - Sides are off the chain. Mac and cheese is top tier. Best wings I've ever had. They smoke them, flash fry them, dust with rub, them serve. Their BBQ by itself if kinda meh but they do a great job with making dishes with it. My favorite is their chopped brisket quesadillas. Not on the menu but they'll make it on request. Listed as an app but makes 2 meals for me.
     
    #1 Billdozer, Jul 20, 2015
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2016
  2. cuangler

    cuangler
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    That apple slaw recipe is incredible. I highly recommend it.
     
  3. hawk217

    hawk217
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    BBQ fanatic checking in
     
    TheTigerMan and Cutig like this.
  4. AC-

    AC-
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    Thank you for starting this. Can't wait to make my first contributions.
     
  5. Cutig

    Cutig
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    My name is Rod, and I like to party
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    Poblano corn slaw is my favorite

    Hopefully we have a good number of bbqers here, I know there were a few posting on the mb thread
     
  6. a congressman

    a congressman
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    Yes. I m here to contribute to the thread. Is @SWUtigers here?
     
  7. tiger tiger woods y'all

    tiger tiger woods y'all
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    Can't wait till I settle down and build my custom home back in god country. I will be killing the BBQ game...
     
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  8. cut68

    cut68
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    Since my company considers this site safe, I will be contributing more in the future.
     
  9. cuz28

    cuz28
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    you work for a company of fools. this site finna run the cfb game like some illuminati shit. [insert evil laugh, followed by secret DVU handshake]
     
    cut68 likes this.
  10. CoastalOrange

    CoastalOrange
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  11. HotButteredGrits

    HotButteredGrits
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    Smoking Tri-Tip

    do indirect to get it to temp and then sear

    good tips from @dblplay1212
    Rub as you would a steak. 50/50 salt and pepper works well. Smoke at 275 until it hits 118. Normally takes 45 minutes to an hour. Take off heat and bring your cooker up to searing temps. Sear each side for roughly 2 minutes. If you want fancy grill marks, rotate 45 degrees after 1 minute on each side. After 2 minutes at high temps, pull and check temp. You're looking for 122-ish. Anywhere 122-127 is fine. Pull and tent to rest. Temp will rise a little during rest. After rest, cut against the gain and enjoy.
     
    Billdozer likes this.
  12. Billdozer

    Billdozer
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    #13 in the OP
     
  13. a congressman

    a congressman
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    IMG_20150627_181429.jpg Brisket
     
    #13 a congressman, Jul 22, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2015
  14. a congressman

    a congressman
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    IMG_20141018_165031.jpg Ribs
     
    #14 a congressman, Jul 22, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2015
  15. cuangler

    cuangler
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    Slow morning today. I will try to post some cooks I've done that got lost with the crash.
     
    clemsontyger04 and a congressman like this.
  16. cuangler

    cuangler
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    This onion is a great app. A good candidate for the OP.

    Cut the top off, wrap it in foil, add beef broth, white wine or sherry, and top with jarlsberg. Smoke for an hour or so. It's done when it falls apart. You have a lot of leeway with what you mix in. Chicken broth, butter, Worcestershire, etc... Kind of a poor mans French Onion Soup.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  17. cuangler

    cuangler
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    I ripped off this recipe from Hometeam BBQ. I love these wings so much; a completely different wing from anywhere else. They are brined, smoked and then flash fried for 5 minutes. I just copied the recipe found here:

    http://www.starchefs.com/cook/savory/aaron-siegel/smoked-chicken-wings-alabama-white-sauce

    INGREDIENTS:
    Brined Chicken Wings
    1 gallon water
    1 cup brown sugar
    1 cup kosher salt
    1 bunch thyme
    3 tablespoons crushed red pepper
    24 large chicken wings
    Dry Rub
    ½ cup ground chile powder
    2 tablespoons ginger
    2 tablespoons dry mustard
    3 tablespoons light brown sugar
    2 tablespoons garlic powder
    2 teaspoons cayenne powder
    2 tablespoons coarsley ground black pepper
    2 tablespoons kosher salt
    Smoked Chicken Wings
    Red oak
    Alabama White Sauce
    2 cups Duke's mayonnaise
    ⅔ cup apple cider vinegar
    3 tablespoons sugar
    1 tablespoon kosher salt
    1 teaspoon corsely ground black pepper
    1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
    To Assemble and Serve
    Peanut oil
    METHOD:
    For the Brined Chicken Wings:
    In a large pot, bring water to a simmer and turn off heat. Add all ingredients and whisk until dissolved. Refrigerate until fully chilled. In refrigerator, submerge chicken wings in brine for 4 hours.

    For the Dry Rub:
    In a mixing bowl, combine all ingredients and stir till combined.

    Smoked Chicken Wings:
    Prepare a smoker with red oak and heat to 225°F. Remove Brined Chicken Wings from liquid and pat dry. Add chicken wings to a large mixing bowl and evenly distribute all but 4 tablespoons of Dry Rub. Smoke chicken 2 hours and 30 minutes.

    For the Alabama White Sauce:
    In a large bowl, whisk together mayonnaise, vinegar, sugar, salt, pepper, and cayenne. Chill.

    To Assemble and Serve:
    In a deep fryer, heat peanut oil to 350°F. Fry Smoked Chicken Wings 4 to 6 minutes, until crispy and just caramelized. Remove from fryer, shake off excess oil, and rest 30 seconds. In a mixing bowl, toss together wings and reserved Dry Rub. Serve with ramekin of Alabama White Sauce.

    [​IMG]
     
  18. Cutig

    Cutig
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    My name is Rod, and I like to party
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    Smoked + flash fried wings >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
     
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  19. tiger tiger woods y'all

    tiger tiger woods y'all
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    Can you embed your pictures like an adult. Thanks :acutitout:
     
  20. a congressman

    a congressman
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    Teach me....I use the upload a file button....
     
  21. AC-

    AC-
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    Just use imgur and the imgur app. It's really easy.
     
  22. tiger tiger woods y'all

    tiger tiger woods y'all
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    Selfishly I just want to look at your brisket without opening the file.
     
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  23. a congressman

    a congressman
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    Yea, I know that way. I use tinypic. Can't use any apps. I have a blackberry.
     
  24. brobson

    brobson
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    it's only unthinkable if you don't think it
    First 38

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    When you click on upload a file, the choose a file and click close the image will show under the text window. Click on full image instead of thumbnail
     
    #24 brobson, Jul 22, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2015
    TheTigerMan, a congressman and AC- like this.
  25. brobson

    brobson
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    it's only unthinkable if you don't think it
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    IMG_20150713_141813.jpg

    Like that
     
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  26. cuangler

    cuangler
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  27. Dirty Ears Bill

    Dirty Ears Bill
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  28. a congressman

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  29. Billdozer

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  30. cut68

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  31. a congressman

    a congressman
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    IMG_20150323_202215.jpg Ahhh. Got it. Thanks buddy guy.
     
  32. 19B

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    A jelly doughnut?
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    Brisket I did a month or two ago. I actually got to shoot the shit with John Lewis at the CBWS BBQ last weekend, and he was giving me tips on how to select a brisket out of the meat case at Costco/Sam's. Total Ark moment. Lewis is the La Barbeque guy in Austin that helped Aaron Franklin get up and running.
    [​IMG]
     
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  33. 19B

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    Does that image show up, or no? On mobile, not showing on my phone.
     
  34. cuangler

    cuangler
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    Any tips worth repeating? I usually look for an even distribution of fat and try to feel for any 'hard' fat. I try to tell how it's been cut and if it has any loose ends or bad cut marks, which is a sign of sloppy butchering.
     
  35. Dirty Ears Bill

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    Not showing on my monitor
     
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